Gucci’s Touch of Renaissance 文艺复兴的触动

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Herbarium Bee Incense Burner
The incense burner is designed as a small round dish,featuring Gucci’s Herbarium motif – a whimsical Toile de Jouy design of cherry branches, leaves and flowers, inspired by a vintage fabric. The center bee, a historical Gucci code taken from the ’70s archives, has a small opening to hold an incense stick.

If you are not already a fan of Alessandro Michele then you will be now. Gucci’s designs are going for a thorough rebrand with the launch of its latest line of décor in the fall. Featuring illustrations by Alex Merry Art, Gucci’s Décor collection now highlights signature motifs to wooden chairs, throw pillows and scented candles adorned by metal trays, folding tables, and a range of wallpapers in fabrics like silk, vinyl and paper. The porcelain pieces are produced by Richard Ginori, a Florentine company founded in 1735.

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Tigers Print Metal Folding Table
The metal folding table features a round tray printed with a tigers print. The energy of the tiger – a powerful creature – is captured in various ways throughout the collections. Here, the image is layered together to create an abstract effect. Set atop three legs, the table can be folded and features a ring at the top to hang.

 

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Tiger round small metal tray
The image of the powerful creature – often associated with strength and bravery – is featured throughout the collections in a variety of depictions and has become a symbol of the House.
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Octopus Three Panel Screen
The paneled screen features a sea creature jacquard depicting octopus and jellyfish. Designed to serve as an accent piece or a room divider, the screen is equipped with hinges that allow its width to be adjusted by closing or opening each panel.
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Velvet Cushion with Embroidery
The pillow in plush velvet is embroidered with an icon of the House – flanked by clusters of flowers. Each pillow is filled by hand, sewn and edged with hand-applied fringe silk trim.
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Chiavari Chair With Embroidered Tiger
The Chiavari chair is crafted from wood with a lacquered peacock blue finish. The plush velvet upholstery is embroidered with wreaths of flowers and a tiger head. The embroidery is created using a needlepoint technique – tracing its roots back thousands of years, it was predominant in the 17th century, an era that has influenced the House’s aesthetic.
The intricate motifs are embroidered and then hand-applied, a process that takes approximately 10 hours to complete. Brass nail heads detail the edges of the cushion.

The collection will officially debut in September and will be available via its official website at gucci.com. They have yet to reveal the pricing, but for mega-fans of the brand, no number is too great to have a room empowered by Gucci’s designs. The scents for the candles and incense are concoctions of damask rose, intense birch, orange leaves and beeswax, tomato leaves, long grass peppered with basil and lemongrass and lastly infusion of jasmine, leather and salt.

04-gucci-home-decor-launch-llustration by Alex Merry
Rooster mug
A collection of mugs is embellished with motifs of the House.
The Richard Ginori porcelain coffee mug with lid is topped with a rooster, one of the many animal motifs that have become synonymous with the House.
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Fumus, Star Eye candle
A collection of scented candles is embellished with motifs inspired by the House aesthetic. A blend of wax infused with aromatic extracts and essential oils is presented in blue Richard Ginori porcelain featuring the Star Eye motif. The hand holding a ring, a recurring design seen throughout the collection, decorates the top of the lid. The scent, Fumus, captures the dark and intense fragrance of birch, combined with bright notes of orange leaves and beeswax – aromas that would have filled an artisan’s Florentine workshop.

 

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